Repair and Protect Eyesight Against Aging!

Close up on eyes of mother and daughter faces next to one another

The retina contains a high concentration of melatonin, because she secrets some by itself, but also because melatonin secreted by the pineal gland and circulating in the blood penetrates it easily.

Free radicals and oxidative stress are involved in the development of macular degeneration associated with age. Through its antioxidant and destructive effects of free radicals, melatonin benefits might include protecting the retina from free radical attack and thus help to prevent or delay the development of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

Melatonin may prevent this degradation process in two ways:

– First, it is able to neutralize free radicals and protect the retinal pigment epithelium from damage they may cause.

photreceptors_tn– It then controls the pigmentation of the eye and thus helps to regulate the amount of light reaching the photo-receptors and thus limit the formation of free radicals.

In Practice

If you are among those at risk for AMD (ageing, smoking, high blood pressure, clear eyes, frequent outdoor work, family history of AMD), you can try to mitigate this risk by improving your natural secretion of melatonin.

Unfortunately our pineal gland is weakened and decreases its production of melatonin as soon as in teenage years, and ends up being completely calcified. Being physically active every day, eating and drinking healthily and going to bed early are elements that will help to bring us a healthier Pineal Gland, but there always comes a time in life when we need to add nutritional supplements to fight against the advance of aging.

Our bodies have been developed to live a few decades at most 120 years, so we will have to make efforts to enable us to overcome these limits of today, and also to live these many additional years in good health and joy of having a body that feels and is YOUNG!

We can hope that the science of genetics will allow us, in a few decades from now, to live indefinitely by changing our DNA code, copying certain “immortal” animals, but for now we must find a solution to wait until this GENETIC ERA as arrived!

According to studies Epitalon has been found to activate melatonin secretion. Epitalon repairs the pineal gland, and it triggers the natural production of  melatonin daily (which is why most people take their Epitalon just before going to sleep). Many people taking Epitalon claim a return of perfect vision, and even stop wearing glasses.

bioluma_box600__oceanslab EpitalonThe studies demonstrating the link between healthy telomeres and anti-aging are numerous, and growing. The effects of using Epitalon remains to be one of the strongest methods in maintaining healthy levels of Melatonin, longer telomeres and rejuvenated Eyesight!

(Oceans Lab is our favorite source for Epitalon, and you can Read more about Epitalon, here.)


Source(s):

[1] V. N. Anisimov, S. V. Mylnikov, T. I. Oparina, and V. K. Khavinson, “Effect of melatonin and pineal peptide preparation epithalamin on life span and free radical oxidation in Drosophila melanogaster,” Mech. Ageing Dev., vol. 97, no. 2, pp. 81-91, Aug. 1997.

[2] V. N. Anisimov, S. V. Mylnikov, and V. K. Khavinson, “Pineal peptide preparation epithalamin increases the lifespan of fruit flies, mice and rats,” Mech. Ageing Dev., vol. 103, no. 2, pp. 123-132, Jun. 1998.

[3] S. V. Rosenfeld, E. F. Togo, V. S. Mikheev, I. G. Popovich, V. K. Khavinson, and V. N. Anisimov, “Effect of epithalon on the incidence of chromosome aberrations in senescence-accelerated mice,” Bull. Exp. Biol. Med., vol. 133, no. 3, pp. 274-276, Mar. 2002.

[4] V. K. Khavinson, E. G. Rybakina, V. V. Malinin, I. Y. Pivanovich, S. N. Shanin, and E. A. Korneva, “Effects of short peptides on thymocyte blast transformation and signal transduction along the sphingomyelin pathway,”Bull. Exp. Biol. Med., vol. 133, no. 5, pp. 497-499, May 2002.

[5] V. K. Khavinson, N. M. Timofeeva, V. V. Malinin, L. A. Gordova, and A. A. Nikitina, “Effect of vilon and epithalon on activity of enzymes in epithelial and subepithelial layers in small intestine of old rats,” Bull. Exp. Biol. Med., vol. 134, no. 6, pp. 562-564, Dec. 2002.

 

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