Mercury Levels Are Still High In Freshwater Fish

Fish are an important part of a healthy diet because of their high levels of healthy fats like omega-3 fatty acids, which have antioxidant and heart health benefits. However, most fish contain at least a trace of mercury.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),

For most people, the risk from mercury by eating fish and shellfish is not a health concern. Yet, some fish and shellfish contain higher levels of mercury that may harm an unborn baby or young child’s developing nervous system. The risks from mercury in fish and shellfish depend on the amount of fish and shellfish eaten and the levels of mercury in the fish and shellfish. Therefore, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are advising women who may become pregnant, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and young children to avoid some types of fish and eat fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury.”

The New England Center for Investigate Reporting released a story reporting that mercury levels are still high in freshwater fish.

Mercury emissions from sources in Massachusetts have decreased by 90 percent in the past 20 years, but mercury levels in freshwater fish in the state remain very high, and unsafe for pregnant women and children.

The inability to reduce mercury in fish adds to the concern of similar problems in northern latitudes, where mercury levels are increasing after a period of decline.

We need to figure out what is going on,” said Michael S. Hutcheson, former head of air and water toxics for the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection who retired last month.

To avoid mercury as much as possible, follow our tips showing the types of fish with the least amount of mercury.

Note: None of the information in our website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. The content on our website is for educational purposes only.

 

 

Reference(s)
1. “Mercury Levels Still Dangerously High in Freshwater Fish.” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2015.
2. “Mercury Emissions down but Mercury in Mass. Fish Remains High.” New England Center for Investigative Reporting. New England Center for Investigative Reporting, 19 July 2015. Web. 30 Oct. 2015.
3. “Temporal and Spatial Trends in Freshwater Fish Tissue Mercury Concentrations Associated with Mercury Emissions Reductions.” Environmental Science & Technology. ACS Publications, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2015.
4. “What You Need to Know about Mercury in Fish and Shellfish.” EPA. EPA, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2015.

 

Source(s):

Mercury levels are still high in freshwater fish

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